Knowing More About OniomaniaOr Compulsive Buying Disorder

 

The Kath Kidston purse was only $5 that Karen just had to have it. After all, it was her payday. However, she rushed to the bank to deposit the rest of her money after her purchase.

source: youtube.com

 

“I have over a hundred purses at home. I know I don’t need this one,” she said holding up her recent buy, “But it being on sale is just hard to pass on.”

“I’m a compulsive buyer that’s why I have to deposit my money in the bank. One time, I spent all my pay on some things. My husband and I had a bitter spat about my spending habit that day,” she confessed.

Karen is just one of the 18 million American adults afflicted with oniomania or compulsive buying disorder. Suspecting someone you know and love suffers from this condition, too? It pays to know more about shopaholism.

 

The Stats

According to one study, compulsive buying disorder affects approximately 6% of the women’s population and 5.5% of the men’s in the US alone. But while it’s a dangerous disorder to be had, the American Psychiatric Association doesn’t recognize it as a mental malady on its own in the DSM-5.

Shopping can be a form of therapy for many of us. How do we know we’re bordering on addiction?

source: pinterest.com

 

  • We spend most of our time thinking about shopping and most especially on events when we feel anxious, depressed, emotionally low or even emotionally high (as a way to reward ourselves). Simply put, we’ll ride on any occasion as an excuse to go on a spending spree.
  • We get anxious before we do the buying and feel happy, euphoric even, after the buy.
  • We feel guilty and ashamed later on for buying things we don’t need and might never even use.
  • We are in debt because of our shopping habits.
  • Our lives – works, relationships with others – are negatively affected by our being shopaholics.

In general, health experts see shopaholism as predominantly a women’s health disorder as, based on the numbers, about 90% of those affected are females. The prevalent age the condition starts to surface is between the late teens to the early 20s, about time an individual gets to have a credit card.

 

Shopaholism: Just One Side Of The Face

 

Shopping can be a form of therapy for many of us. How do we know we’re bordering on addiction?

  • We spend most of our time thinking about shopping and most especially on events when we feel anxious, depressed, emotionally low or even emotionally high (as a way to reward ourselves). Simply put, we’ll ride on any occasion as an excuse to go on a spending spree.
  • We get anxious before we do the buying and feel happy, euphoric even, after the buy.
  • We feel guilty and ashamed later on for buying things we don’t need and might never even use.
  • We are in debt because of our shopping habits.
  • Our lives – works, relationships with others – are negatively affected by our being shopaholics.

In general, health experts see shopaholism as predominantly a women’s health disorder as, based on the numbers, about 90% of those affected are females. The prevalent age the condition starts to surface is between the late teens to the early 20s, about time an individual gets to have a credit card.

 

Shopaholism: Just One Side Of The Face

Why do people turn into shopaholics? While shopping addiction affects a person’s brain similar to how alcohol and drugs affect their users, psychologists don’t see it as a separate mental disorder always linking it with other psychological problems when diagnosed.

For one, it might be related to a person’s childhood history. If a child’s parents don’t have time for him and instead use material possessions to fill in that attention void, that child could grow up a compulsive buyer. Secondly, it could be that the compulsive buyer experienced financial and emotional deprivation and compulsive buying is his way of dealing with that feeling of never wanting again. Another thing is it could be the compulsive buyer’s way of dealing with his fears.

Most commonly, however, is oniomania’s association with alcoholism and eating disorders. Health professionals view it as an impulse control issue.

If shopaholism is left untreated, the sufferer will end up incurring a considerable amount of debt which, in turn, would bring about feelings of anxiety and depression.

source: forexlaboratory.org

 

Shopaholism Is Treatable!

Yes, this psychological condition is treatable through support groups much like other addictions, therapies the most common of which is cognitive behavioral therapy and, of course, support from families and friends. At one point, the recovering shopaholic might need to relinquish his finances to a family member to stop him from his overspending habits. This step alone needs someone he can trust to fit in the role.

Shopping can be fun and pleasurable. But it must be done only to buy the things that we need, not go on a purchasing spree just because the act itself is making us happy.